GRANTEES

1
Applications
$ 1
in grants
1
grantees

Arena Players
Maryland

BAMS Fest
Massachusetts

Camille A. Brown and Dancers
New York

Castle of Our Skins
Massachusetts

D-composed
Illinois

Dance Iquail
Pennsylvania

Delirious Dances
New York

Heritage Works
Michigan

Houston Museum of African American Culture
Texas

Jazzantiqua, Inc.
California

The Colored Girls Museum
Pennsylvania

Transformative Culture Project
Massachusetts

Universal Temple of the Arts, Inc.
New York

Young Actors Guild
Tennessee

Zeal Press
California

2020 EMERGENCY GRANTEE

DANCE IQUAIL

DANCE IQUAIL uses the art of dance as a conduit for combating issues of social injustice experienced by the disadvantaged black Philadelphians.

2020 grantree

The Colored Girls Museum

The Colored Girls Museum’s mission is to be a public ritual for the protection, praise and grace of ordinary/extraordinary Colored Girls.

2020 grantee

Castle of our Skins

Born out of the desire to foster cultural curiosity, Castle of our Skins is a concert and educational series dedicated to celebrating Black artistry through music.

2020 grantee

Jazzantiqua

Jazzantiqua Dance & Music Ensemble celebrates the jazz tradition as a vital thread in the cultural fabric of African American history and heritage, and a defining element of the American experience.

PRESS RELEASE

Black Art Futures Fund to distribute $35,000 in emergency grants to small Black Arts organizations.

 

Columbia, SC, March 18, 2020 —

Black Art Futures Fund emerged out of the founder’s past experience as a Development Director and current experience as a consultant with small Black arts organizations, who are historically underfunded and disinvested by the wider philanthropic community, and not always seen as a philanthropic investment by individuals with high net worth—despite their long-standing commitments and service to the communities in which they reside, and the future communities they wish to serve, if ever fully capitalized.

Understanding the restrictive, and often slow, nature of foundation and government grant funding, BAFF arrived at a time where there was little-to-no unrestricted funds for small Black arts organizations or fiscally-sponsored projects.

“Together, the board [of BAFF] and I knew we wanted to try to do things ‘differently’ as a collaborative funding project powered by individuals—that is, quickly, with intention. We were explicit on who the fund is for: the benefit and uplifting of Black arts and artistry, and the communities they serve. I have no idea what we’re up against right now, but, I know that BAFF has an opportunity to lean into this moment of uncertainty and do exactly what we say we set out to do, and do it now,” says founder DéLana R.A. Dameron